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“Andrea Clearfield is to be thanked for daring to “disturb the universe.” – Victor Schermer in nike free hyper venom iii flyknit air

“All About Jazz”

“I believe that we connect through the global language of arts.” – Andrea Clearfield

Winner 2006 Citypaper Choice Awards: Most Creative Way to Spend a Sunday

“For 20 years, contemporary classical pianist-composer Andrea Clearfield has hosted performance salons that throw open the door to artistic possibility. Her gatherings for musicians, composers, poets, dancers and choreographers are not only vibrant recitals, they’re critical sessions for sound explorers, archivists and adventurers tuned into a different cosmic station.”

Watch the TV spot on the Salon on WHYY: WHYY Experience

“Andrea Clearfield’s home-based Salon has been creating community through music for 20 years. This monthly performance and concert series started with friends invited by the musician/composer host and then expanded to a free email subscription service. Clearfield organizes the evening to achieve a warm, engaging concert experience featuring original compositions, jazz, electronic, improvisation, folk, experimental, poetry, dance, world music, and time-honored classical chamber music and opera. As to the performers, Clearfield says, ‘People want to come to a place where they can be really free to express themselves from the heart’.

Watch some Salon performances: nike mens free trainer 30
Jocelyn E. Isaac, dancer nike womens air max 1 se sneakers IYoAVJW
Svitanya Eastern European Women’s Ensemble Caeli Smith, violin and Michael Poll, guitar Sonata for Cello and Piano, Andrew Rudin, composer

Read in the Jerusalem Report “Center City Salonista” by Matt Nesvisky, October 3, 2006

Read in the Philadelphia City Paper Artists in Residence: You never know what you’ll hear in Andrea Clearfield’s living room. By Scott Robinson, October 15, 1998

Salon poster created by Joel Metzger

25 Year Salon Poster created by Antonia Cianfrani

Antonia Cianfrani

25 Year Salon Poster created by Antonia Cianfrani

25 Year Salon Collage created by John Gross

10 Year Anniversary Salon Poster. Photos by Richard Marcus

Quartiles are useful, but they are also somewhat limited because they do not take into account every score in our group of data. To get a more representative idea of spread we need to take into account the actual values of each score in a data set. The absolute deviation, variance and standard deviation are such measures.

The absolute and mean absolute deviation show the amount of deviation (variation) that occurs around the mean score. To find the total variability in our group of data, we simply add up the deviation of each score from the mean. The average deviation of a score can then be calculated by dividing this total by the number of scores. How we calculate the deviation of a score from the mean depends on our choice of statistic, whether we use absolute deviation, variance or nike running shoes 2015 release dates
.

Perhaps the simplest way of calculating the deviation of a score from the mean is to take each score and minus the mean score. For example, the mean score for the group of 100 students we used earlier was 58.75 out of 100. Therefore, if we took a student that scored 60 out of 100, the deviation of a score from the mean is 60 - 58.75 = 1.25. It is important to note that scores above the mean have positive deviations (as demonstrated above), whilst scores below the mean will have negative deviations.

To find out the total variability in our data set, we would perform this calculation for all of the 100 students' scores. However, the problem is that because we have both positive and minus signs, when we add up all of these deviations, they cancel each other out, giving us a total deviation of zero. Since we are only interested in the deviations of the scores and not whether they are above or below the mean score, we can ignore the minus sign and take only the absolute value, giving us the absolute deviation . Adding up all of these absolute deviations and dividing them by the total number of scores then gives us the mean absolute deviation (see below). Therefore, for our 100 students the mean absolute deviation is 12.81, as shown below:

absolute deviation

Another method for calculating the deviation of a group of scores from the mean, such as the 100 students we used earlier, is to use the variance. Unlike the absolute deviation, which uses the absolute value of the deviation in order to "rid itself" of the negative values, the variance achieves positive values by squaring each of the deviations instead. Adding up these squared deviations gives us the sum of squares, which we can then divide by the total number of scores in our group of data (in other words, 100 because there are 100 students) to find the variance (see below). Therefore, for our 100 students, the variance is 211.89, as shown below:

Ernst Barlach is an artist and sculptor mostly remembered today for his works protesting against the war; looking at his World War Two-era works, it is little wonder that most of them were confiscated by the Nazi Party as Degenerate Art. His experiences during World War transformed him from an enthusiastic pro-war supporter, to an active anti-war protester, and he used the horrors he experienced during the Great War as inspiration for his works. For instance, his Magdeburger Ehrenmal sculpture of 1929, shown here, was commissioned to be a memorial of World War I. Instead, based on his own experiences of being mobilized in the war, Barlach sculpted a number of figures – including three German soldiers, a fresh recruit, a young officer and a civilian – all bearing the marks of the pain, horror, and desperation of war. This caused a great deal of controversy, and the attacks on Barlach in response to this work continued right through until his death in 1938.

In 1917, only three years after painting his first pure abstract, Paul Klee was already being dubbed as the best of the new German artists. His works were particularly noteworthy for their sophisticated technique; Klee was heavily influenced by the Cubist art movement and by modern theories of color, meaning that his works always featured a rich texture of brightly colored triangular and circular patterns. In 1921, Klee began a successful career teaching art and ‘Form’ in the esteemed German academies air max nike 180 shoes
and the Dusseldorf Academy, respectively. It was this success that brought him to the attention of the Nazis, who raided his home and ensured he was dismissed from his teaching post. Klee lost 102 of his paintings seized to the Nazis, 17 of which were featured in the 1937 Degenerate Art exhibition.

Emil Nolde was actually a supporter of the Nazi Party from 1920 onward and openly expressed negative views about Jewish artists. Unfortunately for Nolde, he considered Expressionism to be a distinctively Germanic style, and his paintings reflected this. On this view, he and Hitler differed; Hitler was strongly opposed to all forms of modernism, and over 1000 of Nolde’s works were removed from museums – despite the fact that, until this time, Nolde had been greatly esteemed within Germany. The heavy use of flowers and floral imagery throughout his works also reflects his continued interest with the works of Vincent Van Gogh – a fellow ‘degenerate’ artist. However, Nolde was not allowed to paint – even in private – after 1941.

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